Self-identity – who am I?

Self-identity – who am I?

Who I am? Where I go? What kind of person will I be in the end?” These are questions about one’s own identity. Genealogy websites help people trace their ancestors. This is an extremely popular hobby. It shows the importance of one aspect of self-identity when we each ask “Where do I come from?”

How we see ourselves affects our functioning in life and people’s behavior towards us, eg levels of happiness, anxiety, social integration, self-esteem and life satisfaction.

The way the world thinks of us:
The world sees us in terms of physical size, gender, age, health, family situation, employment and social status, income, etc. Or in relation to the roles we perform, e.g. team player, employer, neighbor, family member, friend. Or how we come across to others eg level of intelligence, social skills, whether talkative, calm or emotional, elated or depressed etc.

The private dimension of one’s identity:
However, there is also a private dimension to one’s own identity. For example, if I secretly see myself as a great gardener, I might enthusiastically read gardening books. If I consider myself “old school”, I might tend to read magazines more often than browse the internet.

Part of our own identity is expressed through the style of our clothing: ethnic fashion, formal wear, business casual, sports, goth, punk, etc. However, it is not so easy to put into words who we feel we are truly profound. down.

Some of us have a sense of inner well-being and confidence in the future, despite going through difficult times of failure and adversity. The rest of us can be basically unhappy and dissatisfied with ourselves.

Self-identity as a mixture of traits
Psychologist Carl Rogers believed that emotionally healthy people tend not to identify with roles created for them by others’ expectations and instead seek the real thing within themselves.

The question ‘Who am I?’ rather, it invites an all-or-nothing response. However, one’s self-concept is often a collection of beliefs about one’s self. Our self-knowledge can be ill-defined. Are we not allowed to be complex creatures with a mixture of inconsistent traits? Can’t I be both kind and lazy, honest and untrustworthy, good and bad?

Young people in particular tend to be different people in different social contexts. Who wouldn’t notice a teenager who is cheerful and chatty with his friends, but a different kettle of fish at home, moody and quiet at times. Which is the real person? How to find out who you are?

Studies among teenagers online suggest that anonymity seems to be important. It helps them explore their own priorities and values ​​by experimenting with the way they express different and sometimes conflicting views on things like personal relationships.

Integration and self-identity:
What we like will vary greatly, especially when we are younger. Be it the desire to win arguments, satisfy curiosity, achieve success, find a loving partner, etc.

Yet every new interest we develop takes its place in relation to and cooperates with others.

I would say that as we grow into adulthood, we become more self-aware and also more integrated as a person. In other words, the disharmony between our characteristics is slowly decreasing.

Dominant motivation:
According to this picture of personal growth, everything that is not in harmony is pushed aside. Gradually, a basic current is formed that attracts and carries a person, even if he may not be aware of it. What they love and appreciate about their lives is developing in them.

It explains why people find certain things more interesting and why they live the way we do. In other words, if the individual continues in this way, there is a growth of dominant motivation. What they really want begins to define who they are.

Self-identity refers to core values ​​that influence career choices. For example, an investment banker values ​​money and a school teacher values ​​education and helping students.

In addition to job selection, both negative and positive values ​​appear in other areas that an individual may focus on. It could be gaining power to get your own way in things, achieving celebrity status, or accumulating wealth. It can be the production of quality services or products. Or maybe they want new knowledge and skills. Being a loving parent or partner with happy relationships. It could be one of many things.

Ruling love:
So what gives us energy? Why do we want to get out of bed every morning? What do we live life for? The answer is love, which rules our life and we see it as good. It defines what is meaningful in our daily lives. It forms the principles by which we are guided.

Not even our closest friends can say with certainty what underlying motivation is driving our hearts. Maybe we don’t even know ourselves. But still I am sure that sooner or later the whole color and character of the way we live comes from our ruling love.

Related Articles

Who I am? Where I go? What kind of person will I be in the end?” These are questions about one’s own identity. Genealogy websites help people trace their ancestors. This is an extremely popular hobby. It shows the importance of one aspect of self-identity when we each ask “Where do I come from?”

How we see ourselves affects our functioning in life and people’s behavior towards us, eg levels of happiness, anxiety, social integration, self-esteem and life satisfaction.

The way the world thinks of us:
The world sees us in terms of physical size, gender, age, health, family situation, employment and social status, income, etc. Or in relation to the roles we perform, e.g. team player, employer, neighbor, family member, friend. Or how we come across to others eg level of intelligence, social skills, whether talkative, calm or emotional, elated or depressed etc.

The private dimension of one’s identity:
However, there is also a private dimension to one’s own identity. For example, if I secretly see myself as a great gardener, I might enthusiastically read gardening books. If I consider myself “old school”, I might tend to read magazines more often than browse the internet.

Part of our own identity is expressed through the style of our clothing: ethnic fashion, formal wear, business casual, sports, goth, punk, etc. However, it is not so easy to put into words who we feel we are truly profound. down.

Some of us have a sense of inner well-being and confidence in the future, despite going through difficult times of failure and adversity. The rest of us can be basically unhappy and dissatisfied with ourselves.

Self-identity as a mixture of traits
Psychologist Carl Rogers believed that emotionally healthy people tend not to identify with roles created for them by others’ expectations and instead seek the real thing within themselves.

The question ‘Who am I?’ rather, it invites an all-or-nothing response. However, one’s self-concept is often a collection of beliefs about one’s self. Our self-knowledge can be ill-defined. Are we not allowed to be complex creatures with a mixture of inconsistent traits? Can’t I be both kind and lazy, honest and untrustworthy, good and bad?

Young people in particular tend to be different people in different social contexts. Who wouldn’t notice a teenager who is cheerful and chatty with his friends, but a different kettle of fish at home, moody and quiet at times. Which is the real person? How to find out who you are?

Studies among teenagers online suggest that anonymity seems to be important. It helps them explore their own priorities and values ​​by experimenting with the way they express different and sometimes conflicting views on things like personal relationships.

Integration and self-identity:
What we like will vary greatly, especially when we are younger. Be it the desire to win arguments, satisfy curiosity, achieve success, find a loving partner, etc.

Yet every new interest we develop takes its place in relation to and cooperates with others.

I would say that as we grow into adulthood, we become more self-aware and also more integrated as a person. In other words, the disharmony between our characteristics is slowly decreasing.

Dominant motivation:
According to this picture of personal growth, everything that is not in harmony is pushed aside. Gradually, a basic current is formed that attracts and carries a person, even if he may not be aware of it. What they love and appreciate about their lives is developing in them.

It explains why people find certain things more interesting and why they live the way we do. In other words, if the individual continues in this way, there is a growth of dominant motivation. What they really want begins to define who they are.

Self-identity refers to core values ​​that influence career choices. For example, an investment banker values ​​money and a school teacher values ​​education and helping students.

In addition to job selection, both negative and positive values ​​appear in other areas that an individual may focus on. It could be gaining power to get your own way in things, achieving celebrity status, or accumulating wealth. It can be the production of quality services or products. Or maybe they want new knowledge and skills. Being a loving parent or partner with happy relationships. It could be one of many things.

Ruling love:
So what gives us energy? Why do we want to get out of bed every morning? What do we live life for? The answer is love, which rules our life and we see it as good. It defines what is meaningful in our daily lives. It forms the principles by which we are guided.

Not even our closest friends can say with certainty what underlying motivation is driving our hearts. Maybe we don’t even know ourselves. But still I am sure that sooner or later the whole color and character of the way we live comes from our ruling love.

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